Cutting Roses For Displays

Posted in Cutting Roses for Displays

Helpful Hints For Cut Roses:

* For the flowers to last the longest, it’s best to cut them in the morning. The buds should be just beginning to open at the tips.

* Cut the rose stem just above a five-leaflet leaf (“five”) near the center of the stem, leaving at least two “fives” on the plant.

* Immediately immerse the cut stems in warm water mixed with floral preservative.

* You can place the vase of flowers in the refrigerator for 4 hours to harden them (trick of florists – for longer lasting cut flowers)

* Take roses out of refrigerator and put on display. Enjoy!

How To Dry Roses:

1.) Select the roses you want to dry out. I prefer to keep some of the leaves on when I dry flowers, but that is a personal choice.

2.) Use an existing clothes line or hang a clothes line in a room that is not used very often such as the laundry room, storage room, basement.

3.) If you are drying more than one rose, put a rubber band around the middle of the stem.

4.) Hang the rose(s) upside down on your clothes line and leave for at least a week. If your roses are slightly damp, they need a little more drying time. Note this method works well for herbs too.

If you prefer not to use a clothes line, another method is to tie a ribbon or other strong string (filament and even dental floss works) around the stems and hang them upside down from the cord on your window blinds.

Tips: Before drying roses, make sure they at least have begun to bloom. Fresh roses work the best, because older ones can be too weak and may fall apart.

It’s important to hang roses upside down, to allow all moisture to wick away …

You can encourage a fuller look by gently flipping down the petals. When the roses are completely dry, I like to spray them with a high-shine hairspray. You can also get a glaze at your favorite craft supply store. This gives the rose a “wetter”, shinier and livelier appearance …

I cannot stress enough how important it is to give the flowers enough time to dry completely. If you turn them upright to soon the heavy flower heads will flop to one side. For best results you need air circulation around each flower so you don’t get one side that is flat or shaped funny.

Another way to dry roses is to use silica gel. Check out this easy-to-follow tutorial:

How To Make Rose Potpourri:

I love potpourri!

There’s just something so comforting and inviting about the scent of potpourri greeting you as you enter a room. I like to change potpourris seasonally using a more floral & fruity mix in spring and summer, then changing to something spicier & bolder in the colder months …

The fragrance is achieved by mixing spices and scented “fixatives” to the dried petals and herbs. It’s a great way to keep your home or office environment fragrant for a long time …

Ingredients:

Rose petals
Essential oils
Spices and herbs
Fixative

Instructions:

Collect fresh rose petals and dry them in a flat pan or on a screen until they turn crisp. For each quart of dried petals, add one tablespoon of a fixative. Good fixatives include dried lavender, oak moss, sandalwood, or orrisroot. These are available in chopped form at most herb & spice stores …

Add your favorite spices like vanilla beans, cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, and dried citrus peels. Finally, add a few drops of an essential oil or you can even use your favorite perfume. Seal the mixture in a jar, and let it mellow for approximately two weeks.

Keep shaking the jar every couple of days so that the ingredients blend properly. Don’t cheat and open the jar prematurely!

Rose Potpourri HeartTips:

Place the finished mixture in an open decorative porcelain or glass bowl in your home. Package any extra potpourri in sachet bags tied with pretty ribbons, or place in small jars adorned with a decorative bow. Makes an excellent gift!

Keep the ingredients away from contact with metal. Avoid unnecessary exposure to light …

Remember that as rose petals dry, they shrink to one-third their original volume. I’ve found red, orange, and dark pink petals generally look best in potpourri. White and pale pink petals turn brown as they dry, and yellow petals may also turn a weird color …

Use fragrant rose petals. Roses are at peak fragrance and ideal for potpourri creation when the blooms are only half open. In general, early morning is the best time to cut flowers for this purpose …

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